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QSI 500/600 Series - User Contributed Images

(Click on the images below to see the full-size image)

Abell 2151 -
Hercules Galaxy Cluster

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day!
Congratulations to Tony Hallas for having this image selected as a NASA APOD>>

Abell 2151 is part of a larger Hercules supercluster of galaxies located at a distance of approximately 500 million light years. This remarkable image contains more than 150 galaxies displaying a wide range of galaxy types and a large number of interacting galaxies with interesting tidal "tails."

This Abell 2151 LRGB image was taken by Tony Hallas with a QSI 583ws camera using an AstroPhysics 8" APO refractor at f/8. Total exposure time was 11 hours of luminance using 33 20-minute subexposures plus 140 minutes each through Astrodon E-Series Gen 2 red, green and blue filters using 20-minute subexposures. The image highlights the benefits of the small 5.4µm pixel in the QSI 583 when used with a short to medium focal length telescope.

Roll your mouse over the image at right to see the just the luminance image>>

Full Screen color image (1200x900) 688kb
Larger color image (2400x1800) 2.1mb
Full-size luminance image (3326x2483) 1.9mb
Inverted luminance image (3326x2483) 1.9mb

Click for details about the QSI 583>>

Abell 2151
Roll your mouse over the image above to see the luminance image.
Click to see a larger LRGB image and explore the amazing detail.

IC 1805 - Heart Nebula

The Heart Nebula is an emission nebula approximately 7,500 light years away in Cassiopeia. The huge cloud, which consists mainly of hydrogen, is illuminated by an open cluster of massive stars near the bright central knot. This narrowband image, caputured by Sam Saeed from his backyard in the middle of urban Southern California, is shown with the "Hubble Palette" where SII is mapped to red, Ha is mapped to green and OIII is mapped to blue.

Total exposure time for this remarkable image was 22 hour using a QSI 583ws on his Takahashi FSQ 106-ED at f/3.65. The final image is comprised of 28 15-minute sub-exposures in Ha and SII plus 32 15-minute sub-exposures in OIII using Astrodon narrowband filters.

Click the image at right to see the image in more detail.

Full Screen color image (1200x900) 502kb
Half size color image (1600x1200) 502kb
Full size color image (3200x2400) 1.9mb

Be sure to check out the amazing detail in the full-size image above.

Veil Nebula

IC 1396 and Elephant Trunk

IC1396 is a molecular cloud about 3,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Cepheus. The huge cloud is illuminated by the young blue supergiant near the center of the nebula.

From the bottom of the image in this orientation, the Elephant Trunk Nebula extends up toward the center of IC1396. The head of the "trunk" is a dense globule of gas thought to be an area of star formation containing several very young stars. See a closeup of this area in an Ha image further down this page.

IC1396 spans more than 5 degrees of the sky (10 full moons!). This bi-color narrowband 2x2 mosaic image was caputured by Sara Wager from her remote observatory in Spain close to the Mediterranean coast.

Total exposure time for this beautiful image was over 30 hours using a QSI 690wsg attached to a Takahashi FSQ 85 at f/3.8. The final image is comprised of 32 30-minute sub-exposures in Ha and 28 30-minute sub-exposures in OIII using Astrodon 3nm narrowband filters.

Click the image at right to see the image in more detail.

Large color image (1876x2000) 3.0mb

See more of Sara Wagers images on her web site>>

Veil Nebula

Veil Nebula

The Veil Nebula is a supernova remnant in Cygnus. This 2 frame mosaic narrowband, "Hubble Palette" image was taken by Pierre Tremblay with a QSI 583ws camera through an 8" Takahashi CN-212 Newtonian with a Keller Corrector-Reducer. It shows roughly half of the entire Veil complex.

Total exposure time was 22 hours. Each of the 2 frames that make up the mosaic is comprised of 12 15-minute sub-exposures in Ha and 16 15-minute sub-exposures in SII and OIII using Astrodon narrowband filters.

Click the image at right to see the image in more detail.

Full Screen color image (1200x837) 686kb
Larger color image (2242x1564) 1.9mb

 

Veil Nebula

IC 5070 - Pelican Nebula

This striking narrowband image of the Pelican Nebula was captured by Mario Bautista with a QSI 532ws camera attached to his Takahashi FSQ106EDX at its native resolution of f/5. The Pelican nebula is an emission nebula in Cygnus very close to the North America Nebula.

15-minute sub-exposures were used to build this Hubble palette image using Astrodon Narrowband Filters, mapping OIII to blue, Ha to green and SII to red. Total exposure time was 120 minutes through the OIII filter, 180 minutes through Ha, and 165 minutes though SII.

Click the image at right to see the full-size image. If your browser automatically scales the full-size image to fit your browser window, be sure to click it again to explore the amazing detail at full resolution.

Click for details about the QSI 532>>

Why QSI?
Why QSI?

IC 5070 Pelican Nebula

NGC 7000 - North America Nebula

This LRGB image of the North America nebula was taken with a QSI 540wsi camera attached to a 5" Borg refractor at f/3.8 by Alan Smallbone. Total exposure time was 240 minutes using 10-minute sub-exposures, 10 luminance, 5 red, 5 green and 4 blue through Astronomik Type IIc LRGB color filters.

The expanded field of view offered by the 2048x2048 4mp sensor in the QSI 540 shows a huge portion of the NGC 7000 emission nebula and the rich star field in Cygnus. The low noise of the QSI 500 Series helps bring out the beautiful, subtle details, especially in the fainter areas of the nebula, such as the area around the "Gulf of Mexico."

Click the image at right to see the full-size image.

Click for details about the QSI 540>>

NGC 7000 North America Nebula

NGC 6992 - Veil Nebula

NGC 6992 is part of the larger Veil Nebula, a supernova remnant in Cygnus. This LRGB image was taken by Richard Berry, a CCD imaging pioneer and co-author of The Handbook of Astronomical Image Processing, with a QSI 532ws camera through an 8" f/4 Vixen Newtonian with a Paracorr. Total exposure time was just 50 minutes using 60-second unguided sub-exposures -- 20 luminance images and 10 each RGB through Astronomik filters. Click the image at right to see the full-size image.

Richard Berry has written or co-authored numerous astronomy books including, Build Your Own Telescope, and Discover the Stars. Richard also was a former Editor of Astronomy magazine and helped popularize amateur CCD astronomy in the 1990's with The CCD Camera Cookbook.

Veil Nebula

M51 - The Whirlpool Galaxy

M51 is probably the best known and most photographed example of interacting galaxies. The pair of galaxies in Canes Venatici were originally described by Charles Messier in 1773 and are estimated to be 37 million light years away.

This image of M51 was taken by Alan Smallbone with his QSI 520wsi camera on a Vixen VC200L at f/6.3. Total exposure time was 270 minutes using 10-minute subexposures. The image is a combination of 9 luminance frames and 6 each through Astronomik red, green and blue filters.

There are several small galaxies visible around M51. Click on the image to the right to view the full-size image.

M51

NGC 2264 - Christmas Tree Cluster and Cone Nebula

This image is roughly 5 hours of Hydrogen-alpha data added to an earlier RGB image from a single-shot color camera. The Ha data was captured by Bud Guinn with a QSI 532ws camera on an f/2.8 Takahashi Epsilon-180. The Ha data was captured through an Astrodon 6nm Hydrogen Alpha filter. Click the image at right to see a larger image.

NGC 2264

VDB142 - Elephant Trunk Nebula

This is a Hydrogen-alpha image of VDB-142 in Cepheus, commonly called the Elephant Trunk Nebula. The image was captured by Alan Smallbone with a QSI 516ws camera on a Vixen R200SS f/4 Newtonian with a Baader coma corrector. Total exposure time was 195 minutes. The image is a combination of 11 5-minute, 5 10-minute and 6 15-minute sub-exposures through an Astronomik 13nm Hydrogen Alpha filter. Click the image at right to see the full-size image.

VDB 142 - Elephant Trunk Nebula

NGC 4565 - Spiral Galaxy On Edge

From Earth's perspective we see the spiral galaxy NGC 4565 almost directly along its galactic plane. NGC 4565 is in the constellation Coma Berenices in a rich galaxy area of the sky. Click the image to the right to view the full-size image and you'll see several other faint galaxies in the background.

This image was taken by Alan Smallbone with his QSI 520wsi camera on a Vixen VC200L at f/6.4. Total exposure time was just over 6 hours. The image is a combination of 45 6-minute luminance frames and 5x6x6 RGB through Astronomik LRGB filters.

NGC 4565

M42 - The Great Orion Nebula

This is an Ha/RGB image of Messier Object 42, the Great Nebula in Orion. It was taken with a QSI 532ws camera by Nik Szymanek, a well-known UK imager, using a Vixen ED115S at f/7.7. Click the image at right for a larger image.

M42

M8 - Lagoon Nebula

This image of Messier Object 8, the Lagoon Nebula, was taken with a QSI 516ws camera attached to an Orion 80ed refractor at f/7.5 by Alan Smallbone. Total exposure time was 168 minutes using 3-minute sub-exposures, 23 luminance images and 11 each through Astronomik Type IIc red, green and blue filters. Click the image at right to see the full-size image.

M8 - Lagoon Nebula

Messier Object M13

This LRGB image of M13, the Great Globular Cluster in Hercules, was taken with a QSI 516ws camera attached to an Orion 80ed refractor at f/7.5 by Alan Smallbone. Total exposure time was 96 minutes using 3-minute sub-exposures, 8 each through Astronomik Type IIc luminance, red, green and blue filters.

Click on the image to the right and look around the full-sized image at the small galaxies in the background.

M13

Comet 17P/Holmes

The image to the right is Comet 17P/Holmes captured by Richard Berry using a QSI 532ws camera on an 8-inch f/4 Newtonian with a Parrcorr coma corrector. 60-second sub-exposures were used so as not to saturate the nucleus. The color image spans an extremely wide dynamic range with the inner coma being ~1000 times more intense than the blue outer coma.

Roll your mouse over the comet image to see a Larson-Sekanina rotational difference image which reveals jet-like radial structures in the inner coma. To make this image, a master image was rotated about the location of the nucleus to make two new images. One was rotated 2 degrees clockwise and other 2 degrees counter-clockwise. Both were then subtracted from twice the original image. If there were no radial structure, the coma would appear uniform gray, but the technique reveals small brightness differences if they are present. Click the image at right to see the full-sized Larson-Sekanina rotational difference image.

For more comet images and analysis, visit Richard Berry's web site >> .

Roll your mouse over the image below to see what a Larson-Sekanina image reveals.
Click to see the full-sized Larson-Sekanina rotational difference image.
Comet 17P/Holmes
   
  Would you like to see your images on this page? If you've taken images with your QSI camera that you'd like to share, please contact us and let us know. We want to see your best work and we'll pick the very best examples to display in our web site gallery.


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